When you have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), your immunity will be lower than usual, and sometimes it can cause a lot of trouble when you go out again. As a result, many people with this disease are reluctant to travel. But as long as you are ready, you can enjoy the beauty of outdoor travel just like those who are not sick.

8 Things Do if You Have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

  • Consult a Physician for Advice

Before you travel, discuss your travel plans with your physician so that your physician can assess your ability to cope with your journey and the assistance you need, and follow your doctor’s advice to prepare for the trip.

  • Vaccination

Due to your low immunity, you are advised to receive the latest vaccines before you go out, especially the influenza vaccine against pneumonia, the Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), and other adult vaccines that may be needed. Patients with pneumonia are more likely to develop pneumonia than others. In case of infection, it may take time to stay in hospital and interrupt your travel plans. That’s why vaccination is important to you.

  • Check your device

Ask your doctor to check with you the equipment you have for travel, such as portable oxygen concentrate bottles for travel, and test functions to prevent the risk of failure. Remember: You and your companions are also asked to conduct the tests yourself to ensure there are no problems with the use of your device.

  • Careful Selection of Destinations

Discuss with your physician where you want to go as assessing the right place is key to a patient’s safe travel. If you want to hike, consider the thin concentration of oxygen at high altitudes, which can lead to dyspnea or hypoxemia. As a result, patients with pulmonary disease who can breathe themselves at home may need compressed oxygen to replenish oxygen upon arrival at high altitudes.

  • Be prepared for weather changes



It is important to check the weather forecast before you travel, especially in patients with COPD, so avoid areas where there is a risk of severe climate change or unstable climate. If you are traveling by car or out of the car, you should close the windows and use the air-conditioning inside the car, especially in haze conditions or traffic congestion, and avoid lung-stimulating exhaust gases.

  • Check Airline Regulations
Check Airline Regulations
Photo by JC Gellidon on Unsplash

Depending on the airline’s, your own oxygen compression tank or liquid oxygen is usually not allowed to be used on board the aircraft, so please consult with the manufacturer of your equipment for a flight design and approved by the airline and approved by the airline. Please note that you will normally have to inform the airline at least 48 hours prior to your flight departure time that you will bring your own oxygen device.

  • Advance arrangements by train or bus

Different railway companies have different regulations for passengers to use portable oxygen equipment for travel. Therefore, it is best to check with the railway company at the time of booking or at least 13 hours before the boarding time. The same advice applies when traveling by bus. To prevent the regulations of these different companies, please contact your bus or railway company for confirmation.

  • Take appropriate measures, just in case
For those who travel long distances, please check the availability of qualified oxygen cylinders in advance. This avoids the ability to respond in case of equipment failure, battery light or insufficient medical use.
Photo by Matt Chesin on Unsplash

For those who travel long distances, please check the availability of qualified oxygen cylinders in advance. This avoids the ability to respond in case of equipment failure, battery light or insufficient medical use.

 

 

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